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DNA Restriction Enzymes

"DNA Restriction Enzymes" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings). Descriptors are arranged in a hierarchical structure, which enables searching at various levels of specificity.

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Enzymes that are part of the restriction-modification systems. They catalyze the endonucleolytic cleavage of DNA sequences which lack the species-specific methylation pattern in the host cell's DNA. Cleavage yields random or specific double-stranded fragments with terminal 5'-phosphates. The function of restriction enzymes is to destroy any foreign DNA that invades the host cell. Most have been studied in bacterial systems, but a few have been found in eukaryotic organisms. They are also used as tools for the systematic dissection and mapping of chromosomes, in the determination of base sequences of DNAs, and have made it possible to splice and recombine genes from one organism into the genome of another. EC 3.21.1.


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This graph shows the total number of publications written about "DNA Restriction Enzymes" by people in this website by year, and whether "DNA Restriction Enzymes" was a major or minor topic of these publications.
Bar chart showing 4 publications over 4 distinct years, with a maximum of 1 publications in 1982 and 1983 and 1984 and 1986
To see the data from this visualization as text, click here.